Title

Anthropometric Normative-Reference Standards For Canadian University-Aged Students

Prize Winner

Human Kinetics

Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Oral presentation

Start Date

29-3-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2016 2:20 PM

Faculty

Faculty of Human Kinetics

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Paula van Wyk

Abstract

ANTHROPOMETRIC NORMATIVE-REFERENCE STANDARDS FOR CANADIAN UNIVERSITY-AGED STUDENTS Jordan Deneau1, Michael Mallender1, Paula van Wyk1, Adriana Duquette1, 1Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON Structural anthropometric measurements are based on the standard fixed postures of the human body and are used by ergonomists to design products and environments that accommodate the unique physical constraints of their users [1]. As a result of variability among demographics, it is important that anthropometric normative-reference standards are current [2] and specific to the population they describe [3]. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to create current anthropometric normative-reference standards for a young Canadian adult population. Thirty-six structural body dimensions were manually measured on 279 Canadian university-aged participants (150 male, 129 female). All measurements were taken on the right side of the participants’ body for standardization, and two measurements were taken for each body dimension in a circuit/rotational order to reduce the potential for error. If there was a discrepancy greater than 25mm between the two measurements, a third measurement was taken; and the average of the two closest measurements was recorded. All participants consented to the collection of their anthropometric data as part of a university laboratory based course. A variety of demographic statistics were calculated. As an example, anthropometric measure percentiles were determined for Stature (M: 5th%ile 1668.65mm; 50th%ile 1782.00mm; 95th%ile 1892.58mm F: 5th%ile 1546.25mm; 50th%ile 1640.00mm; 95th%ile 1759.50mm), Sitting Height (M: 5th%ile 845.50mm; 50th%ile 931.25mm; 95th%ile 1282.75mm F: 5th%ile 793.50mm; 50th%ile 870.00mm; 95th%ile 935.24mm), and Hip Breadth (M: 5th%ile 295.50mm; 50th%ile 363.75mm; 95th%ile 440.00mm F: 5th%ile 281.75mm; 50th%ile 358.00mm; 95th%ile 456.50mm). Few studies have reported current Canadian anthropometric normative-reference standards in young adults. The authors are unaware of any Canadian studies that have measured as many as 36 body dimensions on a significant sample size. Thus, the reported anthropometric data can be used as a relevant consideration in Canadian product and environment design. References [1] Pheasant, S. (1996). Bodyspace: Anthropometry, ergonomics, and the design of work. United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis. [2] Pagano, B. T., Parkinson, M. B., & Reed, M. P. (2015). An updated estimate of the body dimensions of US children. Ergonomics, 58(6), 1045-1057. [3] Behara, D. N., & Das, B. (2010). Structural anthropometric measurements of the Canadian adult population: the fallacy of the 'average person' concept. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 13(3), 380-392.

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Mar 29th, 1:00 PM Mar 29th, 2:20 PM

Anthropometric Normative-Reference Standards For Canadian University-Aged Students

ANTHROPOMETRIC NORMATIVE-REFERENCE STANDARDS FOR CANADIAN UNIVERSITY-AGED STUDENTS Jordan Deneau1, Michael Mallender1, Paula van Wyk1, Adriana Duquette1, 1Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON Structural anthropometric measurements are based on the standard fixed postures of the human body and are used by ergonomists to design products and environments that accommodate the unique physical constraints of their users [1]. As a result of variability among demographics, it is important that anthropometric normative-reference standards are current [2] and specific to the population they describe [3]. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to create current anthropometric normative-reference standards for a young Canadian adult population. Thirty-six structural body dimensions were manually measured on 279 Canadian university-aged participants (150 male, 129 female). All measurements were taken on the right side of the participants’ body for standardization, and two measurements were taken for each body dimension in a circuit/rotational order to reduce the potential for error. If there was a discrepancy greater than 25mm between the two measurements, a third measurement was taken; and the average of the two closest measurements was recorded. All participants consented to the collection of their anthropometric data as part of a university laboratory based course. A variety of demographic statistics were calculated. As an example, anthropometric measure percentiles were determined for Stature (M: 5th%ile 1668.65mm; 50th%ile 1782.00mm; 95th%ile 1892.58mm F: 5th%ile 1546.25mm; 50th%ile 1640.00mm; 95th%ile 1759.50mm), Sitting Height (M: 5th%ile 845.50mm; 50th%ile 931.25mm; 95th%ile 1282.75mm F: 5th%ile 793.50mm; 50th%ile 870.00mm; 95th%ile 935.24mm), and Hip Breadth (M: 5th%ile 295.50mm; 50th%ile 363.75mm; 95th%ile 440.00mm F: 5th%ile 281.75mm; 50th%ile 358.00mm; 95th%ile 456.50mm). Few studies have reported current Canadian anthropometric normative-reference standards in young adults. The authors are unaware of any Canadian studies that have measured as many as 36 body dimensions on a significant sample size. Thus, the reported anthropometric data can be used as a relevant consideration in Canadian product and environment design. References [1] Pheasant, S. (1996). Bodyspace: Anthropometry, ergonomics, and the design of work. United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis. [2] Pagano, B. T., Parkinson, M. B., & Reed, M. P. (2015). An updated estimate of the body dimensions of US children. Ergonomics, 58(6), 1045-1057. [3] Behara, D. N., & Das, B. (2010). Structural anthropometric measurements of the Canadian adult population: the fallacy of the 'average person' concept. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 13(3), 380-392.