Title

Accuracy of Students’ Ability in Assessing their Aptitude Toward Entrepreneurship

Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Digital Poster

Start Date

29-3-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2016 2:20 PM

Faculty

Odette School of Business

Faculty Sponsor

Francine Schlosser

Abstract

Title: Accuracy of Students’ Ability in Assessing their Aptitude Toward Entrepreneurship Research Question: What degree of variation exists between one’s perception of his or her aptitude toward entrepreneurship and one’s actual aptitude? Principle Topics: Currently, many people are intrigued by the idea of being an entrepreneur and the highly regarded reputation associated with the title. Thus, the number of individuals who believe they hold entrepreneurial qualities may be much higher than the actual number that does as a result of their inclination to be considered under such a light. However, those who possess entrepreneurial qualities should be geared towards success and most readily be capable of achieving that overall success. Some previous research on the subject exists but does not specifically examine the same topic as the question posed here. Since there is no previous literature readily available regarding this question, the results of this study will provide the initial work that will contribute to a new pool of information related to entrepreneurship. The answer to this question will provide an insight on the number of ‘pseudo-entrepreneurs’ present in a certain academic setting. Such an insight will generate a necessary response for remedying a false sense of assurance in one’s success that possibly exists among individuals hoping to pursue entrepreneurial ventures. Methods: This study involved post-secondary students who were responsible for developing a product while working in a team setting. Teams were composed of students from different disciplines – a combination of business and engineering. The research took place over the course of a normal school semester. Surveys were distributed to students at the beginning and end of the semester, which provided information on whether any change in students’ responses took place over the course of the semester. A comparison between students’ perception of their entrepreneurial skills and their actual ability to exhibit these skills in the real world will be made by comparing survey results with students’ groups marks as well as their individual course mark. Results/ Implications: Since preliminary findings are none-existent, we expect some variation between students’ perceptions of their aptitude toward entrepreneurship and their actual aptitude. There is potential for contributing to pedagogical research by highlighting the gap between perceived aptitude and actual aptitude that may exist in students contemplating the pursuit of entrepreneurial activities. By identifying any misconceptions, weaknesses in one’s entrepreneurial skills can be confronted and dealt with early on before individuals put their own time and money at risk.

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Mar 29th, 1:00 PM Mar 29th, 2:20 PM

Accuracy of Students’ Ability in Assessing their Aptitude Toward Entrepreneurship

Title: Accuracy of Students’ Ability in Assessing their Aptitude Toward Entrepreneurship Research Question: What degree of variation exists between one’s perception of his or her aptitude toward entrepreneurship and one’s actual aptitude? Principle Topics: Currently, many people are intrigued by the idea of being an entrepreneur and the highly regarded reputation associated with the title. Thus, the number of individuals who believe they hold entrepreneurial qualities may be much higher than the actual number that does as a result of their inclination to be considered under such a light. However, those who possess entrepreneurial qualities should be geared towards success and most readily be capable of achieving that overall success. Some previous research on the subject exists but does not specifically examine the same topic as the question posed here. Since there is no previous literature readily available regarding this question, the results of this study will provide the initial work that will contribute to a new pool of information related to entrepreneurship. The answer to this question will provide an insight on the number of ‘pseudo-entrepreneurs’ present in a certain academic setting. Such an insight will generate a necessary response for remedying a false sense of assurance in one’s success that possibly exists among individuals hoping to pursue entrepreneurial ventures. Methods: This study involved post-secondary students who were responsible for developing a product while working in a team setting. Teams were composed of students from different disciplines – a combination of business and engineering. The research took place over the course of a normal school semester. Surveys were distributed to students at the beginning and end of the semester, which provided information on whether any change in students’ responses took place over the course of the semester. A comparison between students’ perception of their entrepreneurial skills and their actual ability to exhibit these skills in the real world will be made by comparing survey results with students’ groups marks as well as their individual course mark. Results/ Implications: Since preliminary findings are none-existent, we expect some variation between students’ perceptions of their aptitude toward entrepreneurship and their actual aptitude. There is potential for contributing to pedagogical research by highlighting the gap between perceived aptitude and actual aptitude that may exist in students contemplating the pursuit of entrepreneurial activities. By identifying any misconceptions, weaknesses in one’s entrepreneurial skills can be confronted and dealt with early on before individuals put their own time and money at risk.