Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Digital Poster

Start Date

29-3-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2016 2:20 PM

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Dusty Johnstone

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Women who have experienced the legal definition of rape, but do not label their experience as such, have been termed “unacknowledged victims” in academic literature. The history of rape research has been marred by minimization, denial, and biased views of women’s experiences. It was not until the early 1970s that research shifted away from perpetrators’ perceived pathology and toward the experiences of victims and their recovery. Research surrounding women’s labelling of unwanted sexual experiences have focused primarily on the differences between women who acknowledge and women who do not acknowledge. This study looks to qualitatively examine the processes behind women’s labelling decisions. An ecological model has been used to conceptualize women’s experiences with close social systems. Women’s perceptions of these systems are examined through qualitative survey items that ask about their attitudes toward disclosure. These open-ended questions will highlight the interaction between women and their close social systems, their experiences with and attitudes toward disclosure, and the reasons behind their labelling decisions. Dr. Dusty Johnstone is supervising this psychology honours thesis. Having conducted a review of relevant research, online data collection is expected to take place by the end of this month. The literature suggests that culture has an important impact upon victim’s post-assault experience. The decision to disclose, in whom to confide, and the expectation of social reactions are all processes situated within a broader cultural context. What this study looks to answer is how individual labelling decisions are shaped by the interaction between victims and their social environment.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Mar 29th, 1:00 PM Mar 29th, 2:20 PM

Rape Acknowledgement and Perceptions of Social Systems

Women who have experienced the legal definition of rape, but do not label their experience as such, have been termed “unacknowledged victims” in academic literature. The history of rape research has been marred by minimization, denial, and biased views of women’s experiences. It was not until the early 1970s that research shifted away from perpetrators’ perceived pathology and toward the experiences of victims and their recovery. Research surrounding women’s labelling of unwanted sexual experiences have focused primarily on the differences between women who acknowledge and women who do not acknowledge. This study looks to qualitatively examine the processes behind women’s labelling decisions. An ecological model has been used to conceptualize women’s experiences with close social systems. Women’s perceptions of these systems are examined through qualitative survey items that ask about their attitudes toward disclosure. These open-ended questions will highlight the interaction between women and their close social systems, their experiences with and attitudes toward disclosure, and the reasons behind their labelling decisions. Dr. Dusty Johnstone is supervising this psychology honours thesis. Having conducted a review of relevant research, online data collection is expected to take place by the end of this month. The literature suggests that culture has an important impact upon victim’s post-assault experience. The decision to disclose, in whom to confide, and the expectation of social reactions are all processes situated within a broader cultural context. What this study looks to answer is how individual labelling decisions are shaped by the interaction between victims and their social environment.