Title

The Effect of Exercise Intensity on Memory Consolidation

Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Oral presentation

Start Date

29-3-2016 8:30 AM

End Date

29-3-2016 9:50 AM

Faculty

Faculty of Human Kinetics

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kevin Milne

Abstract

The Effect of Exercise Intensity on Memory Consolidation The physiological response to stress involves activation of the fight or flight response. In particular, sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, circulating catecholamines and glucocorticoids (cortisol) are elevated. Acute stress is associated with enhanced memory consolidation, a result linked to catecholamine and cortisol at the time of information presentation. Since physical exercise elicits a physiological stress response, it is possible that exercise-induced stress could mimic the memory consolidation processes of other stressors. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of exercise intensity on memory consolidation. METHODS: College-aged participants (n=40; female = 18, male = 22) were shown 20 IAPS rated images (10 seconds per image) following 25 minutes of seated rest (REST; n=10) or cycle ergometer exercise designed to elicit either 40% (LOW; n=10), 60% (MOD; n=9), or 80% (HIGH; n=11) of maximal oxygen consumption. Saliva samples were taken before and after each exercise bout for the analysis of salivary cortisol. Seven days following image viewing, participants were asked to recall as many images as possible and both correct and incorrect recalls were recorded for analysis. Data are presented as means and (SD). RESULTS: Salivary cortisol change was greatest after HIGH [87.6 (154.7) μg/dL] but only significantly different than REST [4.4 (33.1) μg/dL], pCONCLUSIONS: An acute exercise bout of sufficient intensity can improve memory consolidation, particularly of information rated less pleasurable and arousing. However, more information is needed to determine the mechanisms behind this exercise-induced response.

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Mar 29th, 8:30 AM Mar 29th, 9:50 AM

The Effect of Exercise Intensity on Memory Consolidation

The Effect of Exercise Intensity on Memory Consolidation The physiological response to stress involves activation of the fight or flight response. In particular, sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, circulating catecholamines and glucocorticoids (cortisol) are elevated. Acute stress is associated with enhanced memory consolidation, a result linked to catecholamine and cortisol at the time of information presentation. Since physical exercise elicits a physiological stress response, it is possible that exercise-induced stress could mimic the memory consolidation processes of other stressors. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of exercise intensity on memory consolidation. METHODS: College-aged participants (n=40; female = 18, male = 22) were shown 20 IAPS rated images (10 seconds per image) following 25 minutes of seated rest (REST; n=10) or cycle ergometer exercise designed to elicit either 40% (LOW; n=10), 60% (MOD; n=9), or 80% (HIGH; n=11) of maximal oxygen consumption. Saliva samples were taken before and after each exercise bout for the analysis of salivary cortisol. Seven days following image viewing, participants were asked to recall as many images as possible and both correct and incorrect recalls were recorded for analysis. Data are presented as means and (SD). RESULTS: Salivary cortisol change was greatest after HIGH [87.6 (154.7) μg/dL] but only significantly different than REST [4.4 (33.1) μg/dL], pCONCLUSIONS: An acute exercise bout of sufficient intensity can improve memory consolidation, particularly of information rated less pleasurable and arousing. However, more information is needed to determine the mechanisms behind this exercise-induced response.