Prize Winner

Nursing

Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Oral presentation

Start Date

29-3-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

29-3-2016 11:20 AM

Faculty

Faculty of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor

Dr Linda Patrick

Lancer's Lair

1

Abstract

UWill Discover Application Olivia Moretti 104029499 Faculty of Nursing morettio@uwindsor.ca Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Linda Patrick Additional Faculty: Dr. Kathy Pfaff and Dr. Laurie Freeman-Gibb Type of Presentation: Oral Presentation Abstract: Examining the Impact of a Compassion Fatigue Resiliency Program on Cancer Program Staff: A Pilot Study Compassion fatigue is defined as a state in which empathetic energy is depleted in a helping professional from the repeated exposure to traumatized people (Coetzee and Klopper, 2010). It is particularly common among health care providers who work with individuals who are suffering. Long-term effects of compassion fatigue among care providers include: decreased general wellbeing, impaired health, decreased team functioning, and a reduced ability to care in a personal and professional setting. Identification and treatment of compassion fatigue is important to improve the quality of life and care among those who are in the helping profession. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological impact of a compassion fatigue resiliency program on interprofessional staff at the Windsor Regional Hospital Cancer Center. The pilot study involved an embedded experimental mixed methods design. The intervention included six sessions of a formalized compassion fatigue resiliency program. Quantitative pre and post-tests were implemented to measure levels of compassion fatigue and satisfaction, clinical stress, and engagement in collaborative practice. Focus group interviews were conducted mid-program and at completion of the program to understand participants’ views about how the program affected their experiences of compassion fatigue. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed separately and merged to produce the overall findings. Participants reported reduced clinical stress at program completion (t = 3.46; p < .001) This finding is explained by participants’ reported ability to identify signs of compassion fatigue in self and others, engagement in mindfulness, and increased awareness of appropriate work life balance. Participant feedback was positive, and it encouraged offering compassion fatigue resiliency training for care providers in other areas of the hospital organization.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 10:00 AM Mar 29th, 11:20 AM

Examining the Impact of a Compassion Fatigue Resiliency Program on Cancer Program Staff: A Pilot Study

UWill Discover Application Olivia Moretti 104029499 Faculty of Nursing morettio@uwindsor.ca Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Linda Patrick Additional Faculty: Dr. Kathy Pfaff and Dr. Laurie Freeman-Gibb Type of Presentation: Oral Presentation Abstract: Examining the Impact of a Compassion Fatigue Resiliency Program on Cancer Program Staff: A Pilot Study Compassion fatigue is defined as a state in which empathetic energy is depleted in a helping professional from the repeated exposure to traumatized people (Coetzee and Klopper, 2010). It is particularly common among health care providers who work with individuals who are suffering. Long-term effects of compassion fatigue among care providers include: decreased general wellbeing, impaired health, decreased team functioning, and a reduced ability to care in a personal and professional setting. Identification and treatment of compassion fatigue is important to improve the quality of life and care among those who are in the helping profession. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological impact of a compassion fatigue resiliency program on interprofessional staff at the Windsor Regional Hospital Cancer Center. The pilot study involved an embedded experimental mixed methods design. The intervention included six sessions of a formalized compassion fatigue resiliency program. Quantitative pre and post-tests were implemented to measure levels of compassion fatigue and satisfaction, clinical stress, and engagement in collaborative practice. Focus group interviews were conducted mid-program and at completion of the program to understand participants’ views about how the program affected their experiences of compassion fatigue. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed separately and merged to produce the overall findings. Participants reported reduced clinical stress at program completion (t = 3.46; p < .001) This finding is explained by participants’ reported ability to identify signs of compassion fatigue in self and others, engagement in mindfulness, and increased awareness of appropriate work life balance. Participant feedback was positive, and it encouraged offering compassion fatigue resiliency training for care providers in other areas of the hospital organization.