Title

What Does Healthy Mean? Is Physical Literacy Associated With Health/Weight Perceptions Among 8-12 Year Olds?

Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Digital Poster

Start Date

29-3-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2016 5:00 PM

Faculty

Faculty of Human Kinetics

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Sarah Woodruff

Abstract

The Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy (CAPL), as developed by researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), is the first comprehensive protocol that assesses physical literacy in children 8-12 years of age. Physical literacy is the result of an interaction between four domains (Motivation and Confidence, Knowledge and Understanding, Physical Competence, and Daily Behaviour). A questionnaire was administered to 434 children in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Children were asked to draw a line to as many items they thought Healthy means, options included: Eating Well, Feeling Good, Not Being Sick, Being Skinny, and Looking Good, with the latter two being incorrect. Separate multiple linear regression analyses (controlling for age, sex, and BMI) were used to see if the four domain scores were predictors of selecting Being Skinny and Looking Good, indicating a child’s understanding of health. The Knowledge and Understanding score (β=-.163, p=0.002) was a significant predictor of selecting skinny is healthy for children (R2=. 031). Also, the Knowledge and Understanding score (β=-.189, p=0.000) was a significant predictor of selecting looking good is healthy (R2=. 035) for children. Results suggest that with greater Knowledge and Understanding, one is less likely to think skinny and/or good looking is healthy. Future interventions should be aimed at increasing knowledge and understanding of physical literacy to improve understanding of what healthy means.

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Mar 29th, 4:00 PM Mar 29th, 5:00 PM

What Does Healthy Mean? Is Physical Literacy Associated With Health/Weight Perceptions Among 8-12 Year Olds?

The Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy (CAPL), as developed by researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), is the first comprehensive protocol that assesses physical literacy in children 8-12 years of age. Physical literacy is the result of an interaction between four domains (Motivation and Confidence, Knowledge and Understanding, Physical Competence, and Daily Behaviour). A questionnaire was administered to 434 children in southwestern Ontario, Canada. Children were asked to draw a line to as many items they thought Healthy means, options included: Eating Well, Feeling Good, Not Being Sick, Being Skinny, and Looking Good, with the latter two being incorrect. Separate multiple linear regression analyses (controlling for age, sex, and BMI) were used to see if the four domain scores were predictors of selecting Being Skinny and Looking Good, indicating a child’s understanding of health. The Knowledge and Understanding score (β=-.163, p=0.002) was a significant predictor of selecting skinny is healthy for children (R2=. 031). Also, the Knowledge and Understanding score (β=-.189, p=0.000) was a significant predictor of selecting looking good is healthy (R2=. 035) for children. Results suggest that with greater Knowledge and Understanding, one is less likely to think skinny and/or good looking is healthy. Future interventions should be aimed at increasing knowledge and understanding of physical literacy to improve understanding of what healthy means.