Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Oral presentation

Start Date

31-3-2017 3:30 PM

End Date

31-3-2017 4:50 PM

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kathryn Lafreniere

Abstract

The field of positive psychology has grown tremendously since its birth at the end of the 20th century; to the point, now, where a new model of mental health and mental illness has been suggested and supported by research. The Complete State Model of Mental Health, as conceptualized by Dr. Keyes, posits that mental health and mental illness are not opposing ends of a single spectrum but two separate, related dimensions. In this model, mental illness can coexist with mental health and each can shift independently of the other. While research has supported the model, very little work has been done using this lens to determine the antecedents of mental health and illness. In other areas of research, Emotional Intelligence and Hardiness have, each in their own right, been found to have significant roles in numerous desirable outcomes such as effective and transformative leadership in organizations, healthy interpersonal relationships, as well as academic and athletic achievement. Emotional Intelligence refers to our ability to understand the emotions of ourselves and others, as well as the ability to manage these emotions as they arise. Hardiness, on the other hand, concerns the willingness to subject oneself to and persevere through stressful situations; it has been described as an individual’s psychological component of their tendency to be resilient. This research seeks to shed light on the roles that Emotional Intelligence and Hardiness play in the Complete State Model of Mental Health. We hypothesize that individuals high on EI or Hardiness (but not both) will have similar levels of well-being but more measurable stress, anxiety, and depression than their peers who are emotionally intelligent and hardy. Correlational data will be collected in the Winter Semester through FluidSurvey

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Mar 31st, 3:30 PM Mar 31st, 4:50 PM

Functioning vs Flourishing: The Role of Emotional Intelligence and Hardiness in the Complete State Model of Mental Health

The field of positive psychology has grown tremendously since its birth at the end of the 20th century; to the point, now, where a new model of mental health and mental illness has been suggested and supported by research. The Complete State Model of Mental Health, as conceptualized by Dr. Keyes, posits that mental health and mental illness are not opposing ends of a single spectrum but two separate, related dimensions. In this model, mental illness can coexist with mental health and each can shift independently of the other. While research has supported the model, very little work has been done using this lens to determine the antecedents of mental health and illness. In other areas of research, Emotional Intelligence and Hardiness have, each in their own right, been found to have significant roles in numerous desirable outcomes such as effective and transformative leadership in organizations, healthy interpersonal relationships, as well as academic and athletic achievement. Emotional Intelligence refers to our ability to understand the emotions of ourselves and others, as well as the ability to manage these emotions as they arise. Hardiness, on the other hand, concerns the willingness to subject oneself to and persevere through stressful situations; it has been described as an individual’s psychological component of their tendency to be resilient. This research seeks to shed light on the roles that Emotional Intelligence and Hardiness play in the Complete State Model of Mental Health. We hypothesize that individuals high on EI or Hardiness (but not both) will have similar levels of well-being but more measurable stress, anxiety, and depression than their peers who are emotionally intelligent and hardy. Correlational data will be collected in the Winter Semester through FluidSurvey