Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2014

Publication Title

Frontiers in Neurology

Volume

5

DOI

10.3389/fneur.2014.00235

Abstract

Sodium salicylate (SS) is a widely used medication with side effects on hearing. In order to understand these side effects, we recorded sound-driven local-field potentials in a neural structure, the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (ICd). Using a microiontophoretic technique, we applied SS at sites of recording and studied how auditory responses were affected by the drug. Furthermore, we studied how the responses were affected by combined local application of SS and an agonists/antagonist of the type-A or type-B γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAA or GABAB receptor). Results revealed that SS applied alone enhanced auditory responses in the ICd, indicating that the drug had local targets in the structure. Simultaneous application of the drug and a GABAergic receptor antagonist synergistically enhanced amplitudes of responses. The synergistic interaction between SS and a GABAA receptor antagonist had a relatively early start in reference to the onset of acoustic stimulation and the duration of this interaction was independent of sound intensity. The interaction between SS and a GABAB receptor antagonist had a relatively late start, and the duration of this interaction was dependent on sound intensity. Simultaneous application of the drug and a GABAergic receptor agonist produced an effect different from the sum of effects produced by the two drugs released individually. These differences between simultaneous and individual drug applications suggest that SS modified GABAergic inhibition in the ICd. Our results indicate that SS can affect sound-driven activity in the ICd by modulating local GABAergic inhibition.

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