Title

Patch Retention Time in an Omnivore, Dicyphus hesperus is Dependent on Both Host Plant and Prey Type

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2006

Publication Title

Journal of Insect Behavior

Volume

19

Issue

5

First Page

613

DOI

10.1007/s10905-006-9047-y

Abstract

We examined patch residence times for an omnivorous predator, Dicyphus hesperus on a variety of plants and prey. Individual D. hesperus were placed in cages containing either mullein, tomato, pepper or chrysanthemum plants, and either no prey, Mediterranean flour moth eggs, greenhouse whitefly pupae or two-spotted spider mite adults. Patch residence times were typically greater than 24 h. The probability of remaining on the patch was greatest on mullein and tomato, followed by chrysanthemum and least on pepper, whereas probability of remaining on the patch was greatest when flour moth eggs were present, and least when no prey were available. Patch residence time in D. hesperus was determined by both the prey, and the species of plant, in an independent fashion. Our results reinforce the notion that for omnivores, the patch itself is as important as the prey that it harbors.

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