Presentation Title

Indigenizing your Research Office – a Panel Discussion

Start Date

22-11-2018 11:15 AM

End Date

22-11-2018 12:15 PM

Abstract

Jeffery Hewitt

What does it mean to “decolonize” and “indigenize” our research and research offices? How are these processes our responsibility as research administrators? Where do we begin? Jeffery Hewitt will offer a Cree perspective, drawing examples from University of Windsor responses to these questions.

Bio: Jeffery Hewitt (Cree) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Windsor, Faculty of Law. His research interests include Indigenous legal orders and governance, constitutional and administrative law, human rights and remedies, business law, art and law. He teaches constitutional law.

Professor Hewitt has served as Visiting Scholar and McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University as well as adjunct faculty at both Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law; was the 2015 Charles D. Gonthier Fellowship from the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice; and a 2013/14 McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School examining the relationship between Indigenous art and law; is past-President of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada; and since 2002 served as General Counsel to Rama First Nation during which time General Counsel’s office received a 2011 Canadian General Counsel Award for Social Responsibility for work with First Nation Elders and youth.

Professor Hewitt holds an LLB and LLM from Osgoode Hall Law School and is called to the Bar in the Province of Ontario (since 1998); has served on various boards, including Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto; and is currently on the executive of Legal Leaders for Diversity. Professor Hewitt has delivered numerous guest lectures at law schools as well as to both the judiciary and the legal profession in his areas of research.

Sally Gray

Indigenous-centred research is one way of supporting the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Research can be a vehicle through which Indigenous voices are heard and through which solutions to issues facing Indigenous peoples can be created and evaluated with a culturally-appropriate lens. However, we hear over and over again about the barriers to Indigenous-centred research, often as a clash between research expenses and reimbursement policies/procedures. This interactive conversation stream will allow participants to share issues but, hopefully, to also share solutions they’ve put into place at their own institutions.

Bio: Sally Gray is the Director of the Research Office at the University of Regina, a position she has held since July, 2014. She has worked in the field of research administration for 20 years and enjoys working with faculty across the institution, learning about their research interests and ensuring services are available to support faculty in their scholarly activities. She has an undergraduate degree in medieval studies and a Masters in religion and culture.

Outside of the university, Sally is a fibre artist working in multiple media. Two years ago she was able to take a tapestry weaving internship with master weaver Maximo Laura, from the Quechua people of Peru. Maximo has been designated one of Peru's Living Treasures, a UNESCO award given to an artist whose role is to preserve and elevate the culture of their homeland. The internship offered a glimpse into the traditions of Andean culture and world views.

The University of Regina identifies Indigenization as an underlying theme of its strategic plan. The Research Office is examining what Indigenization might mean to the office as well as to the researchers it serves.

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Nov 22nd, 11:15 AM Nov 22nd, 12:15 PM

Indigenizing your Research Office – a Panel Discussion

Jeffery Hewitt

What does it mean to “decolonize” and “indigenize” our research and research offices? How are these processes our responsibility as research administrators? Where do we begin? Jeffery Hewitt will offer a Cree perspective, drawing examples from University of Windsor responses to these questions.

Bio: Jeffery Hewitt (Cree) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Windsor, Faculty of Law. His research interests include Indigenous legal orders and governance, constitutional and administrative law, human rights and remedies, business law, art and law. He teaches constitutional law.

Professor Hewitt has served as Visiting Scholar and McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University as well as adjunct faculty at both Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law; was the 2015 Charles D. Gonthier Fellowship from the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice; and a 2013/14 McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School examining the relationship between Indigenous art and law; is past-President of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada; and since 2002 served as General Counsel to Rama First Nation during which time General Counsel’s office received a 2011 Canadian General Counsel Award for Social Responsibility for work with First Nation Elders and youth.

Professor Hewitt holds an LLB and LLM from Osgoode Hall Law School and is called to the Bar in the Province of Ontario (since 1998); has served on various boards, including Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto; and is currently on the executive of Legal Leaders for Diversity. Professor Hewitt has delivered numerous guest lectures at law schools as well as to both the judiciary and the legal profession in his areas of research.

Sally Gray

Indigenous-centred research is one way of supporting the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Research can be a vehicle through which Indigenous voices are heard and through which solutions to issues facing Indigenous peoples can be created and evaluated with a culturally-appropriate lens. However, we hear over and over again about the barriers to Indigenous-centred research, often as a clash between research expenses and reimbursement policies/procedures. This interactive conversation stream will allow participants to share issues but, hopefully, to also share solutions they’ve put into place at their own institutions.

Bio: Sally Gray is the Director of the Research Office at the University of Regina, a position she has held since July, 2014. She has worked in the field of research administration for 20 years and enjoys working with faculty across the institution, learning about their research interests and ensuring services are available to support faculty in their scholarly activities. She has an undergraduate degree in medieval studies and a Masters in religion and culture.

Outside of the university, Sally is a fibre artist working in multiple media. Two years ago she was able to take a tapestry weaving internship with master weaver Maximo Laura, from the Quechua people of Peru. Maximo has been designated one of Peru's Living Treasures, a UNESCO award given to an artist whose role is to preserve and elevate the culture of their homeland. The internship offered a glimpse into the traditions of Andean culture and world views.

The University of Regina identifies Indigenization as an underlying theme of its strategic plan. The Research Office is examining what Indigenization might mean to the office as well as to the researchers it serves.