Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2021

Publication Title

PharmaNutrition

Volume

17

Keywords

Biotransformation, Diabetes, Insulin sensitization, Microbiome, Probiotic, Symbiosis

Abstract

Background: Catechol, 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, prepared through bacterial biotransformation from higher order polyphenols, has been proposed to regulate carbohydrate metabolism, especially in the context of type 2 diabetes. This review aims to contextualize this finding. It describes the bacterial biosynthesis of catechol both from glucose, and as a degradation product of higher order natural products through bacterial transformation. The review then considers the mechanism of action of glycemic-regulating catechol-containing materials and the complications arising from balancing their inherent activity with that of catechol, their common degradation product. It then enumerates potential dietary sources of catechin from common foods. Methods: Articles were found through using a combination of key word searches in Pubmed, Web of Science, and Scifinder, coupled with following relevant references in those articles, and tracking the articles that cite them. This is not a systematic review, so only those references germane to the specific needs of the review were included. Results/conclusion: Catechol is a potentially promising metabolite for modulating metabolism, but the sources of the catechol themselves mediate glucose homeostasis through a number of competing mechanisms. The levels of catechins is quite low in most dietary foods with the exception of cocoa, chicory, and green tea. Catechin-rich green tea might prove a useful dietary supplement to work with a catechol-producing probiotic; however, further studies are required to determine the physiological relevance of this approach.

DOI

10.1016/j.phanu.2021.100273

E-ISSN

22134344

Available for download on Thursday, September 01, 2022

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