Date of Award

2004

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.Sc.

Department

Biological Sciences

First Advisor

Ciberowski, J. J. H.

Keywords

Biology, Ecology.

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Abstract

Burrowing activities of aquatic benthic organisms can influence sediment suspension and nutrient cycling. The burrowing mayfly Hexagenia is a dominant benthic organism in western Lake Erie, and Hexagenia bioturbation can potentially influence water quality and other benthic organisms. Using laboratory experiments, I determined bioturbation-induced sediment suspension rates of fine Lake Erie sediment caused by Hexagenia larvae of varying body lengths (13--28 mm) at densities of 70--1,111 larvae/m2 and water temperatures ranging from 10--25°C. Bioturbation rates (sediment suspension, g/m2/h) were estimated by nonlinear regression from measurements of suspended sediment concentrations in jars, taken twice-daily for 14 d. Sediment settling rates were also estimated from twice-daily measurements of suspended sediment concentrations collected for an additional 18 d in the surface water from the bioturbation experiments. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 43-01, page: 0145. Adviser: Jan J. H. Ciborowski. Thesis (M.Sc.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 2004.

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