Date of Award

2011

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

First Advisor

O'Connor, Daniel (Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology)

Keywords

Criminology.

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

According to David Garland (1990) punishment today is `a deeply problematic aspect of social life' resulting in a `crisis in penological modernism'. This study explores Garland's claim through an examination of Canadian parole policy and practice. Utilizing a governmentality analytic this study determines what rationales are assembled to support Canadian parole. This is achieved through a discourse analysis of the missions, mandates and objectives of Canadian parole policy and semi-structured interviews with Canadian parole agents working in the field. Understanding the field of Canadian parole as a `field of struggle' illuminates implications in regards to the partnerships in parole, the agency of parole agents and the assemblage of parole governance in Canada. It is argued that Garland's claim in regards to a `crisis' is unfounded in Canadian parole as there is a pervasive institutional identity evidenced by the discourses in Canadian parole policy and the practices of parole agents.

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