Date of Award

2013

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

First Advisor

Lippert, Randy K.

Keywords

Social sciences, Drinking-driving, Governentality, Security, Surveillance, Uncertainty

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

Since the 1980's impaired driving behaviour has gained increased attention in the public sphere. Recently, the provincial government of Ontario has passed new measures designed to control this behaviour. By drawing on Ericson's (2007) analytic of uncertainty this thesis focusses on how risk and uncertainty have shaped the Ontario government's efforts to control impaired driving behaviour in manners that undermine the traditional "principles, standards and procedures" (Ericson, 2007: 30) of law. Through a Foucaultian genealogical analysis of both governmental and non-governmental documents pertaining to recent impaired driving control efforts including; the Road Safety Act, sobriety checkpoints, and report impaired driver initiatives, this thesis analyzes contemporary efforts to control impaired driving behaviour in Ontario from 2000 to 2012. Furthermore, by drawing on work from the larger perspective of governmentality, this thesis recommends changes to both Ericson's (2007) analytic and the governmentality perspective as a whole.

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