Date of Award

2015

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.Sc.

Department

English Language, Literature, and Creative Writing

First Advisor

Dilworth, Thomas

Keywords

Cuchulain, Dubliners, Intertextuality, James Joyce, Mythology, The Dead

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

Irish archetypes change the function of intertextuality in the "The Dead," by mythologizing and de-anglicizing British intertextual allusions in the story, and suggest a new understanding of Joyce's perception of cultural tensions in Ireland. Knowledge of these archetypes is a prerequisite to fully understanding this tension. Many critics fail to notice Joyce's allusions because they are not reading the story within its defining context--which is the Irish Literary Revival. Celtic folklore helps convey his political outlook and his parody of literary activities in Ireland at the time of his writing. The story is essentially a parody with multiple levels of meaning in which the realistic and mythological levels do not cohere, and yet, paradoxically, it achieves an ironic thematic unity.

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