Date of Award

2009

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

First Advisor

Basok, Tanya (Sociology, Anthropology and Criminology)

Keywords

Sociology, Public and Social Welfare.

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

This thesis investigates the politics of homelessness in Ontario by examining two programs, the Consolidated Homelessness Prevention Program (CHPP) and the Hostels- to-Homes (H2H) program, that were created in 2006 and 2007 respectively by the Ministry of Community and Social Services. The CHPP program is designed at the local government level and provides funding and social services to the homeless and hard-to-house. The H2H program is a pilot project directed by the Ministry of Community and Social Services and uses a 'Housing-First' approach to get chronic shelter users into more permanent housing. From a governmentality perspective, this thesis examines how these two program fit into the current political framework of the Ontario government. This research concludes that these programs, with a focus on community and individual responsibility, are symptomatic of advanced liberal governance and that the responsibilization of the homeless has social justice implications.

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