Date of Award

10-5-2017

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Hakim-Larson, Julie

Keywords

Child Maltreatment, Emotion Regulation, Emotion Socialization, Resilience, Trauma

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

There is robust evidence that some people achieve resilience despite adverse experiences (Cicchetti, 2013). The purpose of the present study was to examine if resilience as a trait predicted emotion regulation abilities, and if it moderated the relations between risk and parenting history and emotion regulation abilities. Another aim of the present study was to explore the concept of resilience as an outcome and process through narratives of redemption sequence. Participants consisted of 234 undergraduate students (age ranged from 17-30 years, M = 20.12, SD = 2.17, 79.1% women, 71.37% White) who have experienced a major stressful or traumatic event. Participants completed an online survey, including self-report measures and qualitative items requiring written responses. Results indicated that trait resilience significantly predicted cognitive reappraisal. In addition, more than half of participants reported a redemption sequence despite negative experiences. Additional findings and study implications are discussed.

Share

COinS