Date of Award

2018

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology

First Advisor

Lippert, Randy

Keywords

Consciousness; Mobile Technology; Privacy; Security; Sociology of Law; Surveillance

Rights

CC-BY-NC-ND

Abstract

This thesis explores subjective understandings of mobile technology surveillance, as it seeks to answer an overarching research question: how is surveillance from mobile technologies understood by those who are surveilled? Using Ewick and Silbey’s (1998) socio-legal conception of legal consciousness, this thesis constructs a similar concept within surveillance studies called surveillance consciousness. Surveillance consciousness of drones and Stingrays is explored through comments below the line (see Graham & Wright, 2015) and social media discourse in the post-Snowden era. The findings of this thesis expound on the complexities of subjective understandings of mobile technology surveillance. Such complexities contribute to surveillance studies by addressing whether current theoretical models can be sufficiently used to analyze the current surveillance society. Finally, this thesis shows how two sub-disciplines, surveillance and socio-legal studies, benefit from greater dialogue and cross-fertilization.

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