Date of Award

2008

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.Ed.

Department

Education

First Advisor

Elizabeth Starr

Keywords

Communication and the arts, Education, Psychology

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

Many children with autism have difficulty engaging in social interaction with others. This study sought to determine the effects of using both a music intervention and a non-music intervention on the social responsive and social avoidant behaviours of a preschool child with autism. A single-subject alternating treatment design was used in which the two interventions were presented in a similar fashion except for the addition of music during the music intervention. Data were collected over a total of 12 treatment sessions for various social responsive and avoidant behaviours. Results indicated that the music intervention was more effective than the non-music invention in increasing all three social responsive behaviours. Furthermore, no social avoidant behaviours were observed during the music condition. It is suggested that because music was a preferred activity, the participant was motivated to engage in more social responsive behaviours during the music intervention.

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