Date of Award

2008

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

First Advisor

Ruth Mann

Second Advisor

Jeff Noonan

Third Advisor

Gerald Cradock

Keywords

Social sciences, Psychology

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

This paper explores how and whether the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is being interpreted and employed when mediators assist separating and divorcing families in making custody and access arrangements, and secondly to investigate whether and how the Child's Best Interest Doctrine enters into the rationale used. The data was collected in April and May, 2008 by means of telephone interviews from 17 family mediators who are accredited members of the Ontario Association of Family Mediators. This sample represents approximately 12% of the accredited membership. The interpretation of this data determined there is a minimal level of compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, but there was more compliance with the Child's Best Interest Doctrine.

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