Date of Award

2008

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.Sc.

Department

Civil and Environmental Engineering

First Advisor

S. Das

Keywords

Applied sciences

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

It is found that the residual stresses and strains at a welding connection may cause material yielding in tension. Structural components, such as a ship in service experience continuous fatigue load cycles due to cyclic stress in addition to residual stresses and other locked-in stresses. Thus, there is a build up of fatigue damage. Currently, structures are designed for fatigue and strength. However, the strength design is undertaken assuming they are virgin structures. Therefore, no interaction between fatigue damage and strength is considered. In reality, structural components such as a ship in service for a considerable period of time will have accumulated damage due to fatigue load cycles and this may interact with the mechanical properties such as strength and ductility of the material. Thus, an interaction between fatigue damage and the mechanical properties of structural steel should be considered for safer structural designs. Since, the residual stress alone can cause yielding of steel at welded connections; cyclic stress is expected to produce low-cycle-fatigue locally at these connections. This study was, therefore, undertaken to understand the effect of low-cycle-fatigue damage on the mechanical properties such as strength and ductility of structural steel.

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