Date of Award

2010

Publication Type

Doctoral Thesis

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Education

First Advisor

Nombuso Dlamini

Keywords

Education, Chinese, Cultural learning, English as a second language, Language learning, Willing to communicate

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

This study examined how Chinese students at a Canadian community college were willing to communicate (WTC) in English, and the sociocultural factors that enhanced or limited their willingness to communicate in English in and outside class. The study used a mixed-method design that combined quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis procedures. Data were collected through a survey, semi-structured interviews, and a focus group. First, a questionnaire was administered to 120 Chinese students enrolled in a Canadian college and 46 students responded. From the 46 respondents, twelve participants were selected for semi-structured interviews. Four participants were further selected for a focus group meeting from the interview group.

The results of the survey revealed that Chinese students tended to be generally willing to and frequently communicate in English. These participants' willingness to communicate in English was found to have a significant relationship with their perceived communication behaviours; however, their willingness to communicate did not have a significant relationship with their international posture. Semi-structured interviews revealed that face protection, feedback seeking and the Chinese value of quality talk were the major sociocultural factors that contributed to Chinese students' willingness to communicate in English. These interviews further revealed that Chinese participants did not connect language learning with cultural learning, which negatively impacted their willingness to communicate in English. Educational implications are addressed in the end for enhancing cultural awareness of both students and instructors regarding Chinese students' willingness to communicate in English.

Share

COinS