Date of Award

2009

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.Sc.

Department

Kinesiology

First Advisor

David Andrews

Keywords

Health and environmental sciences, Biological sciences

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

This study examined participants' verbally estimated peak dynamic hand forces compared to actual hand forces during various pushing and pulling tasks. Effects of manual material handling (MMH) experience and feedback training on hand force self-reporting were studied. Verbally estimated hand forces were similar across all four groups, despite different amounts of feedback training received and MMH experience. Participants were more accurate verbally estimating pushes than pulls for two-handed tasks, and at low force level for one and two-handed tasks (mean errors =10.2 % MVC and 9.4 % MVC). Verbal estimation differences existed between high and medium forces for two-handed tasks, and medium and low forces for one and two-handed tasks. No differences were found between genders. Values generated by prediction equations demonstrated a strong relationship between actual and verbally estimated hand forces indicated by high R2. Results indicate that a similar methodology could be performed in workplaces to attain force magnitudes.

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