Date of Award

2008

Publication Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Ed.

Department

Education

First Advisor

Yvette Daniel

Keywords

Education, Social sciences

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

Through an analysis of the hijab as a marker, this study focuses on the constructions of Muslim girls' identity. Ten Muslim girls who wear a hijab and attend public high schools in Windsor, Ontario were provided with a venue to express their perceptions of educational experiences in the Canadian education system. The results of this study challenge the literature that emphasizes the negative experiences and external obstacles that seemingly hinder Muslims from practicing and expressing their Muslim identity in a non-Muslim society. Although participants noted incidents of discrimination and negative stereotyping as problematic issues, they viewed their overall education as positive as a result of wearing the hijab; validating that their Muslim identity helped them perceive education as an overall pleasant experience. This study concludes by offering suggestions for policy reforms in education with regards to inclusive education and accommodation for Muslim students.

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