Date of Award

2008

Publication Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Greg Chung-Yan

Keywords

Psychology

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

Much of the previous research on predictors of sexual harassment coping and reporting has been atheoretical. However, the present study was guided by two theoretical frameworks: Feminist theory and Theories of Organizational justice. This study investigated whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice as well as global organizational justice were related to sexual harassment coping. Participants were 257 female employees who were recruited using the Study Response Project. Multiple regression analyses showed that as their perceptions of organizational justice decreased, sexually harassed women were more likely to avoid their harasser. Sexually harassed women who had experienced more frequent sexual harassment were also more likely to report their harasser as their perceptions of organizational justice increased. However, when the frequency of the sexual harassment was low, perceptions of organizational justice were not related to reporting. Overall, the three types of justice (distributive, procedural and interactional justice) were not related to sexual harassment coping. However, it is still important to examine the factors that encourage women to report their harasser. A discussion of a revised conceptual model is provided.

Share

COinS