Date of Award

1989

Publication Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

R. Daly

Second Advisor

Mary Lou Dietz

Third Advisor

Henry Minton

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Abstract

A review of the literature indicated that females may have a tendency towards greater rating extremity than do males when rating people. The literature on gender-role identity suggested that this may reflect a greater interest on the part of females in the task of rating people. This hypothesis was tested by classifying the subject population into gender-role catagories using the Bern Sex Role Inventory. The type of elements to be rated were manipulated in order to test for an interaction between gender-identity and rating extremity. The data support the hypothesis that rating extremity reflects meaningfulness of the task to the sub j ect however, no interaction between gender-role and element type was found. There appears to be a strong rating extremity response bias which generalizes to other rating tasks and influences the placement of subjects into gender-role categories on the Bern Sex Role Inventory.

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