Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2010

Publication Title

Journal of Canadian Studies

Volume

44

Issue

1

First Page

5

Last Page

35

DOI

10.3138/jcs.44.1.5

Abstract

This essay focusses on the interactions between Department of Fisheries officials and Aboriginal gillnet fishers over science and fisheries regulations on the Nass and Skeena rivers of northern British Columbia in the 1950s and 1960s. Science was used by Western states to study, order, and regulate the natural world, as well as to justify their expanding intervention. This essay argues that although state officials attempted to use science to regulate the fishery, gain co-operation from the fishers, and mitigate tensions, the strategy did not work entirely as the officials expected. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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