Location

Room 3

Document Type

Commentary

Keywords

rhetoric, rhetorical pedagogy, critical thinking, informal logic

Start Date

3-6-2020 3:01 PM

End Date

3-6-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

In her paper, Ismail argues that common approaches to teaching critical thinking based on informal logic are inadequate and that equating the ability to think critically with the ability to analyze and evaluate arguments is problematic. To remedy these inadequacies, she proposes a pedagogy based in rhetoric. I first examine her critiques of informal logic, seconding many of her concerns regarding the limitations of equating critical thinking with argument analysis and evaluation. I concur with her judgment that there is a case to be made for broadening the scope of critical thinking instruction and argue that the need for a broader focus has, in fact, been recognized in some theorizing about and educational approaches to critical thinking. Turning to the alternative she proposes of rhetorical pedagogy, I request a clarification of how she understands rhetoric, rhetorical pedagogy, and the relationship between rhetorical pedagogy and critical thinking and ask what a pedagogy which explicitly calls on rhetoric might add to these recent broader approaches.

Included in

Philosophy Commons

Share

COinS
 
Jun 3rd, 3:01 PM Jun 3rd, 4:00 PM

Comments on Developing Critical Thinking with Rhetorical Pedagogy by Elizabeth Ismail

Room 3

In her paper, Ismail argues that common approaches to teaching critical thinking based on informal logic are inadequate and that equating the ability to think critically with the ability to analyze and evaluate arguments is problematic. To remedy these inadequacies, she proposes a pedagogy based in rhetoric. I first examine her critiques of informal logic, seconding many of her concerns regarding the limitations of equating critical thinking with argument analysis and evaluation. I concur with her judgment that there is a case to be made for broadening the scope of critical thinking instruction and argue that the need for a broader focus has, in fact, been recognized in some theorizing about and educational approaches to critical thinking. Turning to the alternative she proposes of rhetorical pedagogy, I request a clarification of how she understands rhetoric, rhetorical pedagogy, and the relationship between rhetorical pedagogy and critical thinking and ask what a pedagogy which explicitly calls on rhetoric might add to these recent broader approaches.