Author ORCID Identifier

http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1209-3892 : Keren Escobar

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2019

Publication Title

Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Volume

46

First Page

37

Last Page

48

Keywords

Barrio advantage, gender, health care reform, health insurance, Hispanic enclave, Hispanic paradox, intersectionality, marriage, poverty

Abstract

We examined Hispanic enclave paradoxical effects on cancer care among socioeconomically vulnerable people in pre-Obamacare California. We conducted a secondary analysis of a historical cohort of 511 Hispanic and 1,753 non-Hispanic white people with colon cancer. Hispanic enclaves were neighborhoods where 40% or more of the residents were Hispanic, mostly first-generation Mexican American immigrants. An interaction of ethnicity, gender, and Hispanic enclave status was observed such that the protective effects of living in a Hispanic enclave were larger for Hispanic men, particularly married Hispanic men, than women. Risks were also exposed among other study groups: the poor, the inadequately insured, Hispanic men not residing in Hispanic enclaves, Hispanic women, and unmarried people. Implications for the contemporary health care policy debate are discussed.

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