Title

Marley's Journey

Type of Proposal

Film/Media

Start Date

22-3-2018 10:55 AM

End Date

22-3-2018 12:15 PM

Location

Alumni Auditorium A

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Marley’s Journey is a short documentary about a 3 year-old girl named Marley Bechard who has Angelman Syndrome. Angelman syndrome is a genetic disorder which causes developmental disabilities, neurological problems and sometimes, seizures. 1 in 15,000 children in Canada are diagnosed with Angelman Syndrome. It a very rare syndrome that not many people are aware of. Although extensive research is being done, there is still no cure for Angelman. Therefore, this documentary was made to bring awareness to Angelman Syndrome and share the struggles and triumphs that Marley and her family face. Qualitative research was done in the making of this documentary. Organizations such as Canadian Angelman Syndrome Society and interviews from Marley’s parents, neurologist, and speech-therapist helped in providing valuable information on the syndrome. The method used in creating the documentary was detailed storytelling and using the right music to make scenes more impactful. Marley’s Journey was filmed in a month using film equipment. A documentary works in raising awareness about Angelman Syndrome because it allows us to teach the audience what Angelman Syndrome is through Marley and her family. Furthermore, a documentary can be shared easily though social media such as Facebook and Youtube, which makes it easy to reach a large audience. Observations from posting the documentary online and showcasing it to audiences were many individuals were now informed of what Angelman Syndrome is and aware that donations are needed to find a cure. It is hoped that this film will bring awareness to Angelman Syndrome and encourage all who watch it to donate to foundations raising money to find a cure for individuals with Angelman Syndrome, also known as Angels. A question for further research would be to ask doctors and researchers how close they are to finding a cure for Angelman Syndrome.

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Mar 22nd, 10:55 AM Mar 22nd, 12:15 PM

Marley's Journey

Alumni Auditorium A

Marley’s Journey is a short documentary about a 3 year-old girl named Marley Bechard who has Angelman Syndrome. Angelman syndrome is a genetic disorder which causes developmental disabilities, neurological problems and sometimes, seizures. 1 in 15,000 children in Canada are diagnosed with Angelman Syndrome. It a very rare syndrome that not many people are aware of. Although extensive research is being done, there is still no cure for Angelman. Therefore, this documentary was made to bring awareness to Angelman Syndrome and share the struggles and triumphs that Marley and her family face. Qualitative research was done in the making of this documentary. Organizations such as Canadian Angelman Syndrome Society and interviews from Marley’s parents, neurologist, and speech-therapist helped in providing valuable information on the syndrome. The method used in creating the documentary was detailed storytelling and using the right music to make scenes more impactful. Marley’s Journey was filmed in a month using film equipment. A documentary works in raising awareness about Angelman Syndrome because it allows us to teach the audience what Angelman Syndrome is through Marley and her family. Furthermore, a documentary can be shared easily though social media such as Facebook and Youtube, which makes it easy to reach a large audience. Observations from posting the documentary online and showcasing it to audiences were many individuals were now informed of what Angelman Syndrome is and aware that donations are needed to find a cure. It is hoped that this film will bring awareness to Angelman Syndrome and encourage all who watch it to donate to foundations raising money to find a cure for individuals with Angelman Syndrome, also known as Angels. A question for further research would be to ask doctors and researchers how close they are to finding a cure for Angelman Syndrome.