Title

Bond Functionalization with a Tunable Pentanuclear Nickel Carbide Cluster

Type of Proposal

Oral Presentation

Start Date

23-3-2018 12:40 PM

End Date

23-3-2018 2:00 PM

Location

Alumni Auditorium B

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Abstract/Description of Original Work

The activation and cleavage of strong bonds such as sp3 C-C bonds and C-H bonds has always been a challenging, lucrative and important field in chemistry. This is due to the vast importance of C-C and C-H bond activation across many fields, from pharmaceutical to petrochemical.1-2 Transition metals have seen use in recent years, functionalizing bonds as catalysts. This allows reactions involving these difficult functionalizations to be made more sustainable and practical.3-5 However, what are currently the most efficient choices of late transition metal catalysts must be improved drastically before they can be used. A compound discovered in recent years by the Sam Johnson Research Group at the University of Windsor, a pentanuclear nickel carbide cluster of the form Ni5(iPr3P)5H4C, shows promising reactivity using an uncommonly studied metal, Nickel, which possesses greatly untapped potential. Thanks to its’ central carbide, the cluster is suspected to possess greatly increased stability for use in reactions. Using nuclear-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), the compound was discovered to perform uniquely selective reactions with fluorinated aromatics, and through x-ray diffraction crystallography, two additional modified versions of the cluster were discovered suggesting its’ potential to be a tunable reagent which can be adapted to specific reactions. Through further NMR kinetics studies, X-ray diffractometer crystallography and elemental analysis, the potential for the compound to be a catalyst is to be explored further in this project. (1) Mkhalid, I. A. I.; Barnard, J. H.; Marder, T. B.; Murphy, J. M.; Hartwig, J. F. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 890-931. (2) (10) Labinger, J. A.; Bercaw, J. E. Nature. 2002, 417, 507-514. (3) 1. Balcells, D.; Clot, E.; Eisenstein, O. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 749-823. (4) 2. Lyons, T. W.; Sanford, M. S. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 1147-1169. (5) 3. Crabtree, R. H. Chem. Rev. 1985, 85, 245-269.

Grand Challenges

Sustainable Industry

Notes

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Mar 23rd, 12:40 PM Mar 23rd, 2:00 PM

Bond Functionalization with a Tunable Pentanuclear Nickel Carbide Cluster

Alumni Auditorium B

The activation and cleavage of strong bonds such as sp3 C-C bonds and C-H bonds has always been a challenging, lucrative and important field in chemistry. This is due to the vast importance of C-C and C-H bond activation across many fields, from pharmaceutical to petrochemical.1-2 Transition metals have seen use in recent years, functionalizing bonds as catalysts. This allows reactions involving these difficult functionalizations to be made more sustainable and practical.3-5 However, what are currently the most efficient choices of late transition metal catalysts must be improved drastically before they can be used. A compound discovered in recent years by the Sam Johnson Research Group at the University of Windsor, a pentanuclear nickel carbide cluster of the form Ni5(iPr3P)5H4C, shows promising reactivity using an uncommonly studied metal, Nickel, which possesses greatly untapped potential. Thanks to its’ central carbide, the cluster is suspected to possess greatly increased stability for use in reactions. Using nuclear-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), the compound was discovered to perform uniquely selective reactions with fluorinated aromatics, and through x-ray diffraction crystallography, two additional modified versions of the cluster were discovered suggesting its’ potential to be a tunable reagent which can be adapted to specific reactions. Through further NMR kinetics studies, X-ray diffractometer crystallography and elemental analysis, the potential for the compound to be a catalyst is to be explored further in this project. (1) Mkhalid, I. A. I.; Barnard, J. H.; Marder, T. B.; Murphy, J. M.; Hartwig, J. F. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 890-931. (2) (10) Labinger, J. A.; Bercaw, J. E. Nature. 2002, 417, 507-514. (3) 1. Balcells, D.; Clot, E.; Eisenstein, O. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 749-823. (4) 2. Lyons, T. W.; Sanford, M. S. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 1147-1169. (5) 3. Crabtree, R. H. Chem. Rev. 1985, 85, 245-269.