Title

Injecting New Knowledge: A Statistical Analysis of Safe Injection Sites and Harm Reduction

Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Abstract

Challenges Theme

Building Viable, Healthy and Safe Communities

Your Location

University of Windsor

Faculty

Faculty of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kate Kemplin

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Objective

Safe injection sites (SIS) are proven to reduce overdoses, crime, and fatal blood-borne infections. Despite those benefits, no sites exist in Windsor, ON., likely due to the abundance of fear-mongering and misinformation. We critically analyzed statistical methods used in dozens of quantitative studies and found critical gaps in peer-reviewed literature worldwide, substantially affecting intravenous drug users and communities around them.

Methods

We systematically analyzed existing studies’ statistical methods to appraise investigations of SIS and harm reduction. To our knowledge, ours is the first academic analysis of statistical methods for SIS and harm-reduction. Statistical rigor in studies regarding SIS and harm reduction vary in methodology and conclusions, presenting a conundrum for government authorities and clinicians alike.

Results

We found alarming methodological issues with SIS studies, such as poor precision and rigor, in addition to failure to adhere to research reporting standards. Such a dearth of attention to detail on this topic warrants more granular study, especially in the Windsor, ON., area. Our recommendations provide reliable basis for government decision-making based on facts, not fear, that will help foster healthy and safe communities.

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Injecting New Knowledge: A Statistical Analysis of Safe Injection Sites and Harm Reduction

Objective

Safe injection sites (SIS) are proven to reduce overdoses, crime, and fatal blood-borne infections. Despite those benefits, no sites exist in Windsor, ON., likely due to the abundance of fear-mongering and misinformation. We critically analyzed statistical methods used in dozens of quantitative studies and found critical gaps in peer-reviewed literature worldwide, substantially affecting intravenous drug users and communities around them.

Methods

We systematically analyzed existing studies’ statistical methods to appraise investigations of SIS and harm reduction. To our knowledge, ours is the first academic analysis of statistical methods for SIS and harm-reduction. Statistical rigor in studies regarding SIS and harm reduction vary in methodology and conclusions, presenting a conundrum for government authorities and clinicians alike.

Results

We found alarming methodological issues with SIS studies, such as poor precision and rigor, in addition to failure to adhere to research reporting standards. Such a dearth of attention to detail on this topic warrants more granular study, especially in the Windsor, ON., area. Our recommendations provide reliable basis for government decision-making based on facts, not fear, that will help foster healthy and safe communities.