Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Poster Presentation

Faculty

Faculty of Human Kinetics

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. David M. Andrews

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Introduction: Head impact research in soccer (e.g., during heading) has increased recently, with the intent to reduce the risk of play-related injuries such as concussions. Low neck strength and head kinematics (e.g., velocity) in players have been proposed as risk factors for concussion1. However, previous research has primarily focused on collegiate athletes1, despite the possible increased risk for youth players due to crucial neurodevelopment occurring in this group2. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine neck strength differences between male and female youth soccer players, and to quantify the relationship between heading velocities and neck strength.

Methods: Participants will include male and female youth soccer players (11 - 13 years old). Neck strength will be quantified while supine during lateral flexion, cervical flexion, and extension using a prone push test with a hand-held dynamometer. Participants will also complete five headers in the lab in each of three directions: balls tossed to them from their right, left, and in front. Three retroreflective markers on each participant’s head will be recorded using five GoPro Hero 9 cameras. ProAnalyst (Xcitex) motion capture analysis software will be used to determine head velocities. Pearson correlations will be completed to assess the strength of the relationship between neck strength and head velocities, and between sex and head velocities.

Expected results: Youth with lower neck strength will have increased head velocities during purposeful heading. Moreover, females will have lower neck strength, and therefore, higher head velocities in comparison to their male counterparts.

Keywords: youth soccer, neck strength, head velocities, sex differences

References:

  1. Dezman, Z. D., Ledet, E. H., & Kerr, H. A. (2013). Neck strength imbalance correlates with increased head acceleration in soccer heading. Sports Health, 5(4), 320-326.
  1. Patel, D. R., Shivdasani, V., & Baker, R. J. (2005). Management of sport-related concussion in young athletes. Sports Medicine, 35(8), 671-84.

Availability

Availability: March 29: 12pm-1pm; March 30: 12pm-3pm; March 31: 12pm-1pm; April 1: 12pm-3pm

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Does Neck Strength in Male and Female Youth Soccer Players Affect Head Velocity During Goal-Directed Heading: A Proposal

Introduction: Head impact research in soccer (e.g., during heading) has increased recently, with the intent to reduce the risk of play-related injuries such as concussions. Low neck strength and head kinematics (e.g., velocity) in players have been proposed as risk factors for concussion1. However, previous research has primarily focused on collegiate athletes1, despite the possible increased risk for youth players due to crucial neurodevelopment occurring in this group2. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine neck strength differences between male and female youth soccer players, and to quantify the relationship between heading velocities and neck strength.

Methods: Participants will include male and female youth soccer players (11 - 13 years old). Neck strength will be quantified while supine during lateral flexion, cervical flexion, and extension using a prone push test with a hand-held dynamometer. Participants will also complete five headers in the lab in each of three directions: balls tossed to them from their right, left, and in front. Three retroreflective markers on each participant’s head will be recorded using five GoPro Hero 9 cameras. ProAnalyst (Xcitex) motion capture analysis software will be used to determine head velocities. Pearson correlations will be completed to assess the strength of the relationship between neck strength and head velocities, and between sex and head velocities.

Expected results: Youth with lower neck strength will have increased head velocities during purposeful heading. Moreover, females will have lower neck strength, and therefore, higher head velocities in comparison to their male counterparts.

Keywords: youth soccer, neck strength, head velocities, sex differences

References:

  1. Dezman, Z. D., Ledet, E. H., & Kerr, H. A. (2013). Neck strength imbalance correlates with increased head acceleration in soccer heading. Sports Health, 5(4), 320-326.
  1. Patel, D. R., Shivdasani, V., & Baker, R. J. (2005). Management of sport-related concussion in young athletes. Sports Medicine, 35(8), 671-84.