Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

2016 9:00 AM

End Date

2016 5:00 PM

Abstract

One way in which the arguer can satisfy the demands of objectivity is by taking into account appropriate dialectical material such as objections, criticisms, counterarguments, alternative positions etc. In this paper, I will argue that there are important differences between a criticism and an objection; that is to say, we should make a distinction between them. In the paper, I will do the following. First, I will review some pertinent literature. Second, I will give my reasons for thinking there is a distinction. Here I will be relying on insights from J. L. Austin and L. Wittgenstein. Third, I will make the distinction between an objection and a criticism by providing a definition of each term with appropriate supporting considerations. Finally, I will give my reasons for believing that the distinction is an important one by showing its utility in argumentation theory.

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 21st, 5:00 PM

On Distinguishing Between an Objection and a Criticism

University of Windsor

One way in which the arguer can satisfy the demands of objectivity is by taking into account appropriate dialectical material such as objections, criticisms, counterarguments, alternative positions etc. In this paper, I will argue that there are important differences between a criticism and an objection; that is to say, we should make a distinction between them. In the paper, I will do the following. First, I will review some pertinent literature. Second, I will give my reasons for thinking there is a distinction. Here I will be relying on insights from J. L. Austin and L. Wittgenstein. Third, I will make the distinction between an objection and a criticism by providing a definition of each term with appropriate supporting considerations. Finally, I will give my reasons for believing that the distinction is an important one by showing its utility in argumentation theory.