Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

6-6-2007 9:00 AM

End Date

9-6-2007 5:00 PM

Abstract

The paper argues that the arguments from probability (eikós) so popular in early Greek rhetoric and oratory essentially operate by appealing to common positions shared by both speaker and audience. Particularly in controversial debate provoked by fundamental dissensus they make their claim acceptable to the audience by pointing out a basic coherence or congruence of the speaker’s narrative with the audience’s own pre-established (legal, moral, emotional) standards or standards of knowledge.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Jeffrey Carr, Commentary on Kraus

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Jeffrey Carr, Commentary on Kraus (June 2007)

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Jun 6th, 9:00 AM Jun 9th, 5:00 PM

Early Greek Probability Arguments and Common Ground in Dissensus

University of Windsor

The paper argues that the arguments from probability (eikós) so popular in early Greek rhetoric and oratory essentially operate by appealing to common positions shared by both speaker and audience. Particularly in controversial debate provoked by fundamental dissensus they make their claim acceptable to the audience by pointing out a basic coherence or congruence of the speaker’s narrative with the audience’s own pre-established (legal, moral, emotional) standards or standards of knowledge.