Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

3-6-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

6-6-2009 5:00 PM

Abstract

The rhetorical theory of argument, if held as the conclusion of an argument, is self-defeating. There are two arguments that it is. First is the quick and dirty argument: the rhetorical theory is that argument quality is adjudged by eliciting conviction, but the case for the theory is not convincing. Second is the process argument: if one has the view that one’s reasons are arranged with the sole purpose of eliciting assent, one does not view one’s resultant commitments as reflective of truth.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Rebecca Macintosh and Sheldon Wein, Commentary on Aikin

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Rebecca Macintosh and Sheldon Wein, Commentary on Aikin (June 2009)

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Jun 3rd, 9:00 AM Jun 6th, 5:00 PM

A Self-Defeat Problem for the Rhetorical Theory of Argument

University of Windsor

The rhetorical theory of argument, if held as the conclusion of an argument, is self-defeating. There are two arguments that it is. First is the quick and dirty argument: the rhetorical theory is that argument quality is adjudged by eliciting conviction, but the case for the theory is not convincing. Second is the process argument: if one has the view that one’s reasons are arranged with the sole purpose of eliciting assent, one does not view one’s resultant commitments as reflective of truth.