Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

3-6-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

6-6-2009 5:00 PM

Abstract

The author argues that recent data suggesting an emerging culture of gullibility among young Internet users is best explained by the latter’s non-culpable misapplication of common testimonial norms to Internet settings. The author further argues for the likelihood that the norms relative to such settings will gradually change, basing this upon research done on the types of norms of trust that tend to evolve in repeated transactions involving significant informational asymmetries.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Jean Goodwin, Commentary on Fields

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Jean Goodwin, Commentary on Fields (June 2009)

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Jun 3rd, 9:00 AM Jun 6th, 5:00 PM

Internet Testimony and the Alleged Culture of Youth Gullibility

University of Windsor

The author argues that recent data suggesting an emerging culture of gullibility among young Internet users is best explained by the latter’s non-culpable misapplication of common testimonial norms to Internet settings. The author further argues for the likelihood that the norms relative to such settings will gradually change, basing this upon research done on the types of norms of trust that tend to evolve in repeated transactions involving significant informational asymmetries.