Title of Presentation

Session E: The Century Club

Sub-theme

Research and Theory

Keywords

Older Adults, Equestrian, Human-Animal Relationships, Interpretive Repertoires

Start Date

12-10-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

12-10-2018 4:15 PM

Abstract

In 1996, the Dressage Foundation in the United States started The Century Club, a program that recognizes equestrians who compete with a combined age with their horses of over 100 years. Using discourse analysis, this paper analyzes the interpretive repertoires of older equestrians as they reflect in interviews on the bond with their equine counterpart. Through this analysis, we explore the complex relationship formed over time between older adults and equine athletes in the context of dressage. Key themes identified through the current research are those relating to the specific repertoires used in making sense of ones involvement in equestrian sport, their relationship they have with their horse, as well as the nature of the human-animal bond and the nature of sport among older adults. Specifically, in examining the significance of the relationship between older adults and their horses, current research identifies themes existing across relationships built through a long-term involvement in sport. Considerations for future research include issues that effect older adults like loneliness, the ethics of caring, embodied knowledge, and public engagement in social networks.

Keywords: Older adults, equestrian, human-animal relationship, interpretive repertoires

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 12th, 3:00 PM Oct 12th, 4:15 PM

Session E: The Century Club

In 1996, the Dressage Foundation in the United States started The Century Club, a program that recognizes equestrians who compete with a combined age with their horses of over 100 years. Using discourse analysis, this paper analyzes the interpretive repertoires of older equestrians as they reflect in interviews on the bond with their equine counterpart. Through this analysis, we explore the complex relationship formed over time between older adults and equine athletes in the context of dressage. Key themes identified through the current research are those relating to the specific repertoires used in making sense of ones involvement in equestrian sport, their relationship they have with their horse, as well as the nature of the human-animal bond and the nature of sport among older adults. Specifically, in examining the significance of the relationship between older adults and their horses, current research identifies themes existing across relationships built through a long-term involvement in sport. Considerations for future research include issues that effect older adults like loneliness, the ethics of caring, embodied knowledge, and public engagement in social networks.

Keywords: Older adults, equestrian, human-animal relationship, interpretive repertoires