Date of Award

2011

Publication Type

Master Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.Sc.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Lafreniere, Kathryn (Psychology)

Keywords

Health Care Management.

Rights

info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Abstract

Using the Theory of Self-Determination, the study sought to understand the factors that influence HIV treatment adherence among people living with HIV (PLWH). Fifty-seven people completed the self-report questionnaires (Phase I) and 11 took part in face-to-face interviews (Phase II). Results indicated that 42% of the sampled PLWH were not completely adherent to their HIV treatment. While the mediational hypotheses were not supported, bivariate correlations pointed to the importance of having an autonomy-supportive physician, as this variable was associated with better adherence, low depression and anxiety, higher social support, and fewer experiences of stigma. Barriers to successful adherence were experiencing side effects. Phase II findings revealed the importance of family support as a motivator for adherence. Participants also shared stories of experienced stigma in hospital settings, but these negative experiences were not related to poor adherence. Interventions should be created to guide physicians to be more supportive of patient autonomy.

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