Title

Synthesis of the Natural Tn Antigen Found on Tumor Cells

Submitter Information

Sabrina M. PiazzaFollow

Type of Proposal

Oral Presentation

Start Date

22-3-2018 9:20 AM

End Date

22-3-2018 10:40 AM

Location

Alumni Auditorium B

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. John F. Trant

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Immunotherapeutic cancer treatment is a way of having the body’s immune system attack cancer cells in order to slow growth and/or prevent metastasis. The Tn antigen was discovered 60 years ago and has been found in cancer cells of the breast, lung, colon, bladder, cervix, ovary, stomach, pancreas, and prostate; it is found on over 90% of breast cancers. It is never found on healthy cells. This antigen has been linked to metastasis and poor prognosis; it also escapes immunosurveillance, meaning the immune system does not see it as foreign. Today, the pure Tn antigen is difficult to isolate from biological systems in sufficient amounts, therefore it must be synthesized chemically or enzymatically in order to perform future studies (1 gram costs about $400,000). The Trant Team is currently working to chemically synthesize the two derivatives of the Tn antigen (attached to both the amino acids Serine and Threonine). The first step is to find a way to synthesize the natural antigen on a large scale with a quicker and more optimal synthesis than the current methods available. Once the Tn antigen is made, it will be analyzed for stability against our acetal-free versions (see other Trant Team presentations!). The overall goal is to create a stable derivative of the Tn antigen that will be able to stimulate the immune system into attacking certain cancers. Although the Tn antigen may be small in size and simple in structure, the biology and cancer specificity is what makes this molecule so complex. This presentation will show our synthesis and discuss the role of the tumour-associated carbohydrate antigens in cancer.

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Mar 22nd, 9:20 AM Mar 22nd, 10:40 AM

Synthesis of the Natural Tn Antigen Found on Tumor Cells

Alumni Auditorium B

Immunotherapeutic cancer treatment is a way of having the body’s immune system attack cancer cells in order to slow growth and/or prevent metastasis. The Tn antigen was discovered 60 years ago and has been found in cancer cells of the breast, lung, colon, bladder, cervix, ovary, stomach, pancreas, and prostate; it is found on over 90% of breast cancers. It is never found on healthy cells. This antigen has been linked to metastasis and poor prognosis; it also escapes immunosurveillance, meaning the immune system does not see it as foreign. Today, the pure Tn antigen is difficult to isolate from biological systems in sufficient amounts, therefore it must be synthesized chemically or enzymatically in order to perform future studies (1 gram costs about $400,000). The Trant Team is currently working to chemically synthesize the two derivatives of the Tn antigen (attached to both the amino acids Serine and Threonine). The first step is to find a way to synthesize the natural antigen on a large scale with a quicker and more optimal synthesis than the current methods available. Once the Tn antigen is made, it will be analyzed for stability against our acetal-free versions (see other Trant Team presentations!). The overall goal is to create a stable derivative of the Tn antigen that will be able to stimulate the immune system into attacking certain cancers. Although the Tn antigen may be small in size and simple in structure, the biology and cancer specificity is what makes this molecule so complex. This presentation will show our synthesis and discuss the role of the tumour-associated carbohydrate antigens in cancer.