Title

Creative Arts and Well Being in Seniors Living in a Retirement Community

Type of Proposal

Visual Presentation (Poster, Installation, Demonstration)

Start Date

22-3-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

22-3-2018 4:30 PM

Location

Atrium

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Michelle McArthur

Abstract/Description of Original Work

In 2011, 5.0 million Canadians were 65 years and older and Arts Health Network Canada predicts that by 2036 that number will soar to 10.4 million. This enormous surge will increase the need for public and private assisted living for seniors. Now is the time to look at opportunities for our ageing population. Our research hopes to contribute to the reshaping of creative arts engagement and ageing. Since 2014, the National Center for Creative Ageing (NCCA) has held an annual conference on “how the arts help older adults lead healthier lives”. There has been in recent years a necessity for such an exchange between researchers, psychologists, medical doctors, educators, therapists, stakeholders, etc. Our research question is: How does drama impact the sense of well-being of seniors living in retirement homes? As a starting place, we will look to the research of Dr. Gene D. Cohen, a psychiatrist and pioneer of geriatric mental health whose longitudinal study, the first of its kind, provides proof of the positive “impact of cultural programs on the health and well-being of older adults.” This is relevant to our research because we are also hoping to record the affects our program will have on older adults well being. We will be using professor of music education, Dr. Andrea Creech’s three factors well-being; purpose, autonomy and social affirmation. In February and March, our researchers will facilitate weekly workshops at Amica at Windsor Retirement Living with a group of participants. To measure the impact of drama on their sense of well-being of seniors living in retirement homes, we will use two primary methodologies: ongoing reflective praxis and post interviews.

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Mar 22nd, 2:30 PM Mar 22nd, 4:30 PM

Creative Arts and Well Being in Seniors Living in a Retirement Community

Atrium

In 2011, 5.0 million Canadians were 65 years and older and Arts Health Network Canada predicts that by 2036 that number will soar to 10.4 million. This enormous surge will increase the need for public and private assisted living for seniors. Now is the time to look at opportunities for our ageing population. Our research hopes to contribute to the reshaping of creative arts engagement and ageing. Since 2014, the National Center for Creative Ageing (NCCA) has held an annual conference on “how the arts help older adults lead healthier lives”. There has been in recent years a necessity for such an exchange between researchers, psychologists, medical doctors, educators, therapists, stakeholders, etc. Our research question is: How does drama impact the sense of well-being of seniors living in retirement homes? As a starting place, we will look to the research of Dr. Gene D. Cohen, a psychiatrist and pioneer of geriatric mental health whose longitudinal study, the first of its kind, provides proof of the positive “impact of cultural programs on the health and well-being of older adults.” This is relevant to our research because we are also hoping to record the affects our program will have on older adults well being. We will be using professor of music education, Dr. Andrea Creech’s three factors well-being; purpose, autonomy and social affirmation. In February and March, our researchers will facilitate weekly workshops at Amica at Windsor Retirement Living with a group of participants. To measure the impact of drama on their sense of well-being of seniors living in retirement homes, we will use two primary methodologies: ongoing reflective praxis and post interviews.