Title

The Role Student Partners Play in Conducting Course Feedback

Submitter Information

Alexa DunnFollow

Prize Winner

Understanding Borders

Type of Proposal

Oral Presentation

Start Date

22-3-2018 2:30 PM

End Date

22-3-2018 4:30 PM

Location

Atrium

Faculty

Odette School of Business

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Nobuko Fujita and Werner Keller

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Modifying the delivery of a course can be a long and arduous process, fraught with seemingly more pitfalls than strides. Having student partners can make the process more streamlined, and reduce the frustration often encountered. Student partners who are made to feel like valuable members of an interdisciplinary team can provide constructive feedback from the student perspective. Furthermore, they can help with the iterative design process, while simultaneously gaining valuable experience. Capitalizing on the strengths of the students can result in innovations, such as videos created by the student partners to present confusing pedagogy to students in a relatable manner. The process of modifying course is when the delivery method, assessment and evaluation techniques, and/or class structure is changed with the intent to provide a benefit to the students’ learning. This modification is an on-going process, taking place while the course is in session, as well as before and after, and is guided by the iterative design process. Student partners for this presentation were hired by the Office of Open Learning and are working on content for a class they are not enrolled in. Based on an in-depth review of the current literature on the topic, there is a need for qualitative analysis from both the perspective of the student partners and the faculty that they work with. This presentation will feature how course delivery can be modified from the perspective of student partners, outlining the process from a literature review, to the collection of feedback, to the assessment of whether the proposed change is beneficial to the learning environment. The data presented is both qualitative and quantitative and comes from three different semesters. The preliminary findings suggest there to be a large benefit to both the course coordinator and the student partner, as well as enriching the learning environment for the students enrolled in the course.

Notes

I am working with three different departments, the office of open learning, the odette school of business and then psychology in the FAHSS

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Mar 22nd, 2:30 PM Mar 22nd, 4:30 PM

The Role Student Partners Play in Conducting Course Feedback

Atrium

Modifying the delivery of a course can be a long and arduous process, fraught with seemingly more pitfalls than strides. Having student partners can make the process more streamlined, and reduce the frustration often encountered. Student partners who are made to feel like valuable members of an interdisciplinary team can provide constructive feedback from the student perspective. Furthermore, they can help with the iterative design process, while simultaneously gaining valuable experience. Capitalizing on the strengths of the students can result in innovations, such as videos created by the student partners to present confusing pedagogy to students in a relatable manner. The process of modifying course is when the delivery method, assessment and evaluation techniques, and/or class structure is changed with the intent to provide a benefit to the students’ learning. This modification is an on-going process, taking place while the course is in session, as well as before and after, and is guided by the iterative design process. Student partners for this presentation were hired by the Office of Open Learning and are working on content for a class they are not enrolled in. Based on an in-depth review of the current literature on the topic, there is a need for qualitative analysis from both the perspective of the student partners and the faculty that they work with. This presentation will feature how course delivery can be modified from the perspective of student partners, outlining the process from a literature review, to the collection of feedback, to the assessment of whether the proposed change is beneficial to the learning environment. The data presented is both qualitative and quantitative and comes from three different semesters. The preliminary findings suggest there to be a large benefit to both the course coordinator and the student partner, as well as enriching the learning environment for the students enrolled in the course.