Submitter Information

Shereen JonathanFollow

Type of Proposal

Oral Presentation

Start Date

23-3-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

23-3-2018 10:20 AM

Location

Alumni Auditorium B

Faculty

Faculty of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kathryn Pfaff

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Abstract Background: Caregivers in long-term care (LTC) often struggle to manage the holistic care for residents who have complex health needs, and are nearing end-of-life. Schwartz Rounds® can be used to operationalize compassionate collaborative practice, thus improve team relationships, resident care, and retention of long-term care caregivers. These Rounds promote open and honest dialogue about feelings that emerge as a result of caregiving. Through sharing this burden, the Rounds can improve how interprofessional teams care for self and others. Objectives: In this paper, we report an adapted protocol for Schwartz Rounds that can be implemented to enhance compassionate collaborative practice in LTC. Methods: We conducted an in-depth literature review to understand the nature and implementation of Schwartz Rounds. Following a keyword search of various databases, we retrieved, reviewed and integrated evidence about protocols and processes for conducting Rounds. Experts in LTC reviewed and contributed to the protocol development. Results: Rounds are structured as monthly opportunities through which professional and non-professional caregivers can share feelings and responses to specific resident care issues. A LTC team member frames the topic and encourages discussion. A panel of caregivers participate in roundtable dialogue regarding a real resident case. The discussion generates awareness of emotional care responses and support for team members. Conclusions: Implementing Schwartz Rounds in LTC has potential to combat compassion fatigue, improve resident care, retain the LTC workforce, and improve compassionate collaborative practice. Leadership at the point-of-care and administrative levels are essential to successfully overcoming implementation challenges.

Notes

Added the word "adapted" as per reviewer suggestions. "report an adapted protocol"

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Mar 23rd, 9:00 AM Mar 23rd, 10:20 AM

Sharing the Burden: Schwartz Rounds® as a Compassionate Collaborative Practice Model in Long-Term Care

Alumni Auditorium B

Abstract Background: Caregivers in long-term care (LTC) often struggle to manage the holistic care for residents who have complex health needs, and are nearing end-of-life. Schwartz Rounds® can be used to operationalize compassionate collaborative practice, thus improve team relationships, resident care, and retention of long-term care caregivers. These Rounds promote open and honest dialogue about feelings that emerge as a result of caregiving. Through sharing this burden, the Rounds can improve how interprofessional teams care for self and others. Objectives: In this paper, we report an adapted protocol for Schwartz Rounds that can be implemented to enhance compassionate collaborative practice in LTC. Methods: We conducted an in-depth literature review to understand the nature and implementation of Schwartz Rounds. Following a keyword search of various databases, we retrieved, reviewed and integrated evidence about protocols and processes for conducting Rounds. Experts in LTC reviewed and contributed to the protocol development. Results: Rounds are structured as monthly opportunities through which professional and non-professional caregivers can share feelings and responses to specific resident care issues. A LTC team member frames the topic and encourages discussion. A panel of caregivers participate in roundtable dialogue regarding a real resident case. The discussion generates awareness of emotional care responses and support for team members. Conclusions: Implementing Schwartz Rounds in LTC has potential to combat compassion fatigue, improve resident care, retain the LTC workforce, and improve compassionate collaborative practice. Leadership at the point-of-care and administrative levels are essential to successfully overcoming implementation challenges.