Title

Personality differences in peer review

Submitter Information

Jenessa ShawFollow

Type of Proposal

Oral Presentation

Start Date

23-3-2018 10:35 AM

End Date

23-3-2018 11:55 AM

Location

Alumni Auditorium A

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Ken Cramer

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Peer reviews offer a unique assessment of post-secondary students’ writing, wherein students grade fellow students’ (peers’) essay submissions according to a rubric. Previous research found personality was related to the grades students both gave and received during peer-assessment: conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness predicted higher grades, whereas academic entitlement and grade orientation predicted lower grades. Moreover, peer-assessment has been found to yield similar results to expert assessment, however peers are consistently more lenient in the grading. Past studies have found both agreeableness and extroversion in raters is related to higher grading leniency, whereas conscientiousness is related to lower grading leniency. A better understanding of the interaction between personality traits, grades, and rater leniency will provide insight on factors contributing to academic success aside from intelligence and aid in explaining the variance in grades for the same assignment. The present study examined the influence of personality factors on rater leniency and grades received during an introduction to psychology peer review assignment. Participants completed an online survey assessing academic entitlement, learning orientation, grade orientation, narcissism, and the Big-5 personality traits. These measures were later merged with the peer review grades. Results from correlational analyses revealed academic entitlement and narcissism were related to lower grades, while conscientiousness was related to higher grades. Moreover, students higher in conscientiousness, learning orientation attitudes, and grade orientation attitudes gave more accurate and less lenient grades. Lastly, more variance in the grades received during the peer review was found to be related to higher narcissism and openness scores, as well as lower agreeableness. Possible explanations for these findings are explored.

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Mar 23rd, 10:35 AM Mar 23rd, 11:55 AM

Personality differences in peer review

Alumni Auditorium A

Peer reviews offer a unique assessment of post-secondary students’ writing, wherein students grade fellow students’ (peers’) essay submissions according to a rubric. Previous research found personality was related to the grades students both gave and received during peer-assessment: conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness predicted higher grades, whereas academic entitlement and grade orientation predicted lower grades. Moreover, peer-assessment has been found to yield similar results to expert assessment, however peers are consistently more lenient in the grading. Past studies have found both agreeableness and extroversion in raters is related to higher grading leniency, whereas conscientiousness is related to lower grading leniency. A better understanding of the interaction between personality traits, grades, and rater leniency will provide insight on factors contributing to academic success aside from intelligence and aid in explaining the variance in grades for the same assignment. The present study examined the influence of personality factors on rater leniency and grades received during an introduction to psychology peer review assignment. Participants completed an online survey assessing academic entitlement, learning orientation, grade orientation, narcissism, and the Big-5 personality traits. These measures were later merged with the peer review grades. Results from correlational analyses revealed academic entitlement and narcissism were related to lower grades, while conscientiousness was related to higher grades. Moreover, students higher in conscientiousness, learning orientation attitudes, and grade orientation attitudes gave more accurate and less lenient grades. Lastly, more variance in the grades received during the peer review was found to be related to higher narcissism and openness scores, as well as lower agreeableness. Possible explanations for these findings are explored.