Title

The Effect of Exercise Training on Re-establishment of the Extracellular Matrix Following Muscle Damage

Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Poster Presentation

Challenges Theme

Open Challenge

Faculty Sponsor

Matthew Krause

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Skeletal muscle is a highly versatile tissue that has the ability to move and perform a wide range of tasks, but through these movements, can be damaged. When skeletal muscle is damaged, it has the remarkable ability to regenerate back to its original function. The most important step in skeletal muscle regeneration involves the proliferation of satellite cells, which is the rapid increase in the number muscle stem cells. These cells fuse with the damaged muscle fibre and fuse with one another to repair the damage. Part of this regeneration process involves the remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the coating that surrounds each muscle fibre. The ECM is essential to the muscle fibre’s function, as it serves important structural and chemical signalling roles. Satellite cells also regulate the repair process of the ECM and several studies demonstrate exercise as a method to improve the remodelling of the ECM. Of the different components of the ECM, Collagen I, Collagen IV, Fibronectin, and Matrix Metalloporteinases (MMP) have been found to be the ECM proteins that respond to exercise the most. To look at these changes, 12-week-old mice were exercised for two weeks following cardiotoxin-induced damage. Changes in the ECM were be examined using immunohistochemistry techniques at several time points (3, 5, 7, and 14 days), and preliminary results reveal that a greater expression of Collagen 1 is evident in the exercise group. To date, no study has looked at how the ECM is remodelled following cardio-toxin induced damaged. Results from this study can help gain a better understanding of the effects of exercise training on regenerating skeletal muscle.

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The Effect of Exercise Training on Re-establishment of the Extracellular Matrix Following Muscle Damage

Skeletal muscle is a highly versatile tissue that has the ability to move and perform a wide range of tasks, but through these movements, can be damaged. When skeletal muscle is damaged, it has the remarkable ability to regenerate back to its original function. The most important step in skeletal muscle regeneration involves the proliferation of satellite cells, which is the rapid increase in the number muscle stem cells. These cells fuse with the damaged muscle fibre and fuse with one another to repair the damage. Part of this regeneration process involves the remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the coating that surrounds each muscle fibre. The ECM is essential to the muscle fibre’s function, as it serves important structural and chemical signalling roles. Satellite cells also regulate the repair process of the ECM and several studies demonstrate exercise as a method to improve the remodelling of the ECM. Of the different components of the ECM, Collagen I, Collagen IV, Fibronectin, and Matrix Metalloporteinases (MMP) have been found to be the ECM proteins that respond to exercise the most. To look at these changes, 12-week-old mice were exercised for two weeks following cardiotoxin-induced damage. Changes in the ECM were be examined using immunohistochemistry techniques at several time points (3, 5, 7, and 14 days), and preliminary results reveal that a greater expression of Collagen 1 is evident in the exercise group. To date, no study has looked at how the ECM is remodelled following cardio-toxin induced damaged. Results from this study can help gain a better understanding of the effects of exercise training on regenerating skeletal muscle.