Submitter and Co-author information

Aadil NathaniFollow

Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Challenges Theme

Building Viable, Healthy and Safe Communities

Your Location

Windsor, Ontario

Faculty

Faculty of Law

Faculty Sponsor

Dr Anneke Smit

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Gentrification of neighbourhoods is a consequence of revitalization projects and is aided by municipal practices and policies. This paper asks what the municipality can do within its legislative power to minimize the harsh impacts of gentrification such as displacement, lack of affordable housing, and the silencing of voices of marginalized people in community development or urban planning. This paper comes during an opportune time as cities across Canada continue to grow in population, are aging and grapple with their role in dealing with social issues. This paper discusses the nuanced relationship between sustainability of healthy communities and management of growth, while particularly focusing on the ignored voices of marginalized people in these processes. Using an in-depth literature review and focusing on examples from the City of Toronto, this paper proposes a solution which would mitigate the negative effects of gentrification. Municipalities in Ontario have tools at their disposal to provide a voice to marginalized communities in revitalization projects, yet they tend to favour the interests of developers and condo dwellers. This paper asserts that proper community consultation and the use of community land trusts can minimize the harm caused by gentrification in a manner where the interests of all parties involved in revitalization can be properly balanced.

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Revisiting Revitalization: How Municipalities Can Positively Impact Gentrification

Gentrification of neighbourhoods is a consequence of revitalization projects and is aided by municipal practices and policies. This paper asks what the municipality can do within its legislative power to minimize the harsh impacts of gentrification such as displacement, lack of affordable housing, and the silencing of voices of marginalized people in community development or urban planning. This paper comes during an opportune time as cities across Canada continue to grow in population, are aging and grapple with their role in dealing with social issues. This paper discusses the nuanced relationship between sustainability of healthy communities and management of growth, while particularly focusing on the ignored voices of marginalized people in these processes. Using an in-depth literature review and focusing on examples from the City of Toronto, this paper proposes a solution which would mitigate the negative effects of gentrification. Municipalities in Ontario have tools at their disposal to provide a voice to marginalized communities in revitalization projects, yet they tend to favour the interests of developers and condo dwellers. This paper asserts that proper community consultation and the use of community land trusts can minimize the harm caused by gentrification in a manner where the interests of all parties involved in revitalization can be properly balanced.