Title

Social Support Among Refugee Youth in Windsor

Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Challenges Theme

Open Challenge

Your Location

Windsor, Ontario

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Dr Jayashree Mohanty

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Social Support Among Refugee Youth in Windsor

Lack of social support among newcomer refugee youth creates many challenges upon arriving in Canada. These challenges include navigating the system, being involved in the community, adapting to the new cultural environment, and finding employment. This impacts the wellbeing of youth and their confidence to be active members of the community. This study is using a qualitative design, with in-depth interviews that will be conducted from a sample of 16 respondents who had been in Canada between 1 - 4 years. The respondents are refugee youth whose ages are between 18 - 24 years of age. In addition, the social circle scale will be used to identify the care and support that these newcomer youth can benefit from, to measure their social wellbeing and their inclusion within Canadian society. Ultimately, newcomer youth experience uneven connections to social milieus, employment opportunities, and treatment in public spaces. Schools have become areas of inclusion and exclusion for newcomer youths. Whilst outside these institutions, their social participation experiences are regulated by participation to spaces that are migrant specific. Furthermore, these experiences are negatively impacting many young people’s successful transition to adulthood. This is an open challenge that has implications to social work practice.There is an urgent need for the government and social service organizations to work together to bridge the gaps and improve conditions for young newcomers who constitute a potential major force to fill the need of the aging Canadian population.

Special Considerations

Our research is in process. We have the ethical application approved for our research. Also, we have the initial list of participants from following the agencies Matthew House and WEST to start interviewing participants. Our plan is to conduct 16 interviews in 2 weeks and have an analysis completed before the presentation. Our addition to the literature review is that when we conduct the research, we want to understand how newcomer refugee youth cope with immigration and settlement challenges. We would also like to understand the implications that refugee youth Immigration and settlement experiences have on policy and service provision.

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Social Support Among Refugee Youth in Windsor

Social Support Among Refugee Youth in Windsor

Lack of social support among newcomer refugee youth creates many challenges upon arriving in Canada. These challenges include navigating the system, being involved in the community, adapting to the new cultural environment, and finding employment. This impacts the wellbeing of youth and their confidence to be active members of the community. This study is using a qualitative design, with in-depth interviews that will be conducted from a sample of 16 respondents who had been in Canada between 1 - 4 years. The respondents are refugee youth whose ages are between 18 - 24 years of age. In addition, the social circle scale will be used to identify the care and support that these newcomer youth can benefit from, to measure their social wellbeing and their inclusion within Canadian society. Ultimately, newcomer youth experience uneven connections to social milieus, employment opportunities, and treatment in public spaces. Schools have become areas of inclusion and exclusion for newcomer youths. Whilst outside these institutions, their social participation experiences are regulated by participation to spaces that are migrant specific. Furthermore, these experiences are negatively impacting many young people’s successful transition to adulthood. This is an open challenge that has implications to social work practice.There is an urgent need for the government and social service organizations to work together to bridge the gaps and improve conditions for young newcomers who constitute a potential major force to fill the need of the aging Canadian population.