Title

Can group membership and volunteering predict well-being in the World Values Survey: Correlates, sex differences, and age moderation

Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Other: (please identify)

Oral Research Presentation or Poster Presentation

Challenges Theme

Building Viable, Healthy and Safe Communities

Your Location

Windsor

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Kenneth Cramer

Abstract/Description of Original Work

The present study explores the relation between social interest and well-being, as measured by perceived group membership and volunteering. Three hypotheses predicted that: (a) group membership and volunteering would be positively correlated with well-being, (b) this correlation would differ by both sex, and (c) age. We analysed Wave-6 of the World Values Survey (2010-2014), consisting of 89 564 respondents from 60 nations distributed world-wide. Group membership and volunteering were correlated with measures of well-being (as measured by both perceived happiness and perceived health); notable sex differences are outlined. Finally, age acted as a significant moderator wherein the relation between group membership and well-being was stronger among older respondents. Our findings endorse future research of social interest through active measures such as group membership and volunteering. Older populations may benefit significantly from active participation in organizations; suggesting this behavior should be promoted in maintaining a happy and healthy lifestyle later in one's life. Interventions involving social interest based practices could be advantageous for clinical populations in conjunction with other modalities.

Keywords: social interest, group membership, volunteering, well-being, sex differences, age differences

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Can group membership and volunteering predict well-being in the World Values Survey: Correlates, sex differences, and age moderation

The present study explores the relation between social interest and well-being, as measured by perceived group membership and volunteering. Three hypotheses predicted that: (a) group membership and volunteering would be positively correlated with well-being, (b) this correlation would differ by both sex, and (c) age. We analysed Wave-6 of the World Values Survey (2010-2014), consisting of 89 564 respondents from 60 nations distributed world-wide. Group membership and volunteering were correlated with measures of well-being (as measured by both perceived happiness and perceived health); notable sex differences are outlined. Finally, age acted as a significant moderator wherein the relation between group membership and well-being was stronger among older respondents. Our findings endorse future research of social interest through active measures such as group membership and volunteering. Older populations may benefit significantly from active participation in organizations; suggesting this behavior should be promoted in maintaining a happy and healthy lifestyle later in one's life. Interventions involving social interest based practices could be advantageous for clinical populations in conjunction with other modalities.

Keywords: social interest, group membership, volunteering, well-being, sex differences, age differences