Title

Spatially Resolved Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Challenges Theme

Building Viable, Healthy and Safe Communities

Your Location

University of Windsor

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Faculty Sponsor

Dan Xiao

Abstract/Description of Original Work

In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the hydrogen 1H signal carries a certain frequency proportional to the static magnetic field strength. Each chemical bond induces a unique shift in the local magnetic field, which can be differentiated in the signal. This forms the basis behind NMR spectroscopy, which allows scientists to identify molecular compounds. A highly uniform static magnetic field is crucial so that the unique shifts can be purely attributed to the sample property. In a large and complicated biological system, such as a human brain, numerous chemical compounds exist. The various chemical shift peaks overlap in a bulk measurement, and individual components cannot be identified. It is also extremely challenging to achieve static magnetic field homogeneity for an extended sample size, which results in a broader spectrum, further confounding the results. To solve this, MR imaging techniques are used to acquire localized NMR spectra. Each individual pixel has less chemical complexity and the field inhomogeneity is less severe. Therefore, high quality spectra can be acquired. The broadened spectrum problem is tested and a solution in the form of MR spectroscopy is presented. Phantoms with multiple chemical shifts are also tested and compared using NMR and MR spectroscopy. Extending the capability of NMR spectroscopy to large biological systems will bring new insights in the study of biofunctions and diseases.

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Spatially Resolved Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the hydrogen 1H signal carries a certain frequency proportional to the static magnetic field strength. Each chemical bond induces a unique shift in the local magnetic field, which can be differentiated in the signal. This forms the basis behind NMR spectroscopy, which allows scientists to identify molecular compounds. A highly uniform static magnetic field is crucial so that the unique shifts can be purely attributed to the sample property. In a large and complicated biological system, such as a human brain, numerous chemical compounds exist. The various chemical shift peaks overlap in a bulk measurement, and individual components cannot be identified. It is also extremely challenging to achieve static magnetic field homogeneity for an extended sample size, which results in a broader spectrum, further confounding the results. To solve this, MR imaging techniques are used to acquire localized NMR spectra. Each individual pixel has less chemical complexity and the field inhomogeneity is less severe. Therefore, high quality spectra can be acquired. The broadened spectrum problem is tested and a solution in the form of MR spectroscopy is presented. Phantoms with multiple chemical shifts are also tested and compared using NMR and MR spectroscopy. Extending the capability of NMR spectroscopy to large biological systems will bring new insights in the study of biofunctions and diseases.