Title

Effect of Branched Polyethylene on the Mechanical and Electronic Properties of Semiconducting Polymers

Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Challenges Theme

Open Challenge

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Simon Rondeau-Gagné

Abstract/Description of Original Work

With the rise of portable and implantable electronics, where objects and human are constantly connected, there is a need for materials that can used in electronic devices that have a good charge transport and eco-friendly properties while also being stable in various conditions. Directly inspired by biological tissues, next generation electronics have to be capable of being molded in different shapes and forms and, more importantly, being utilized directly on (or inside) the human body to enhance our connectivity to the environment. This means that the components required to design and fabricate the next generation electronics need to be electronically and mechanically robust, while possessing properties similar to that of our body.

To address this challenge, our research exploits a combination of a DPP-based conjugated polymer with a low-molecular-weight and low boiling point branched polyethylene (BPE) that are physically blended to improve the mechanical properties of the semiconducting polymers. Using various characterization methods such as atomic-force microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we evaluated the effect of the branched polyethylene additive on the mechanical properties of the polymers. Interestingly, this additive was shown to reduce Young’s modulus, decrease crack propagation, reduce crystallinity, promote aggregation, and increase crack onset strain. Our new materials were used to fabricate organic field-effect transistors, critical components of modern circuits. This presentation will discuss the preparation and characterization of new conjugated polymer and soft materials blends, and will highlight the potential of our new materials for the preparation of next generation electronics and sensors.

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Effect of Branched Polyethylene on the Mechanical and Electronic Properties of Semiconducting Polymers

With the rise of portable and implantable electronics, where objects and human are constantly connected, there is a need for materials that can used in electronic devices that have a good charge transport and eco-friendly properties while also being stable in various conditions. Directly inspired by biological tissues, next generation electronics have to be capable of being molded in different shapes and forms and, more importantly, being utilized directly on (or inside) the human body to enhance our connectivity to the environment. This means that the components required to design and fabricate the next generation electronics need to be electronically and mechanically robust, while possessing properties similar to that of our body.

To address this challenge, our research exploits a combination of a DPP-based conjugated polymer with a low-molecular-weight and low boiling point branched polyethylene (BPE) that are physically blended to improve the mechanical properties of the semiconducting polymers. Using various characterization methods such as atomic-force microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we evaluated the effect of the branched polyethylene additive on the mechanical properties of the polymers. Interestingly, this additive was shown to reduce Young’s modulus, decrease crack propagation, reduce crystallinity, promote aggregation, and increase crack onset strain. Our new materials were used to fabricate organic field-effect transistors, critical components of modern circuits. This presentation will discuss the preparation and characterization of new conjugated polymer and soft materials blends, and will highlight the potential of our new materials for the preparation of next generation electronics and sensors.